How many different types of bishops are there?

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How many different types of bishops are there?

Diocesan Bishop - the primary bishop of a diocese; sometimes referred to as “The Diocesan.” 

 

Bishop Coadjutor - A bishop elected to succeed the Diocesan Bishop. An ordained person consecrated to become the next bishop of a diocese when the diocesan bishop retires; when the bishop retires or resigns, the Co-adjutor becomes the Diocesan and the term Co-adjutor is dropped. Suffragan bishops do not automatically become diocesan bishops. 

 

Bishop Suffragan - A bishop elected to assist the Diocesan Bishop and to serve under the Diocesan’s direction. A working co-bishop in a diocese but without inherent right of succession when the diocesan bishop retires or resigns. Suffragan bishops are sometimes called by another diocese to become their Diocesan bishop. 


Assistant Bishop  - A bishop appointed by the Diocesan Bishop with the consent of the Standing Committee to assist the Diocesan and to serve under the Diocesan’s direction, creation of the post having been approved by the Diocesan Convention. A specially ordained or otherwise specially designated person who has the spiritual and liturgical rank of a bishop and who usually assists the Bishop of a diocese; some retired diocesan bishops become assistants to other bishops; some assistant bishops are specially ordained for their work. Assistant Bishops can perform most functions performed by other bishops.  


Assisting Bishop - A bishop appointed by the Diocesan Bishop to provide short-term assistance with episcopal duties in the Diocese.